“When Tongues Replace Swords: Somatic Transgression and Its Shifting Performance in Early Modern Revenge Tragedy” By Ana Maria Fernandez

The early modern tragic stage added to its cast of players the unruly member of the tongue. Thomas Kyd’s The Spanish Tragedy, William Shakespeare’s Hamlet, and Thomas Middleton’s The Revenger’s Tragedy all dramatize the tongue’s power to transgress the boundaries of the body and interfere with bodily integrity […]

“Night Terrors and Sinister Daydreams: Oneiric Doubles and Psychologies of Moral Management in Jane Eyre and Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” By Mabon Foo

Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre and Robert Louis Stevenson’s Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde both explore instances of duality that negotiate issues of morality and self-control within the Victorian psychological conceptualization of dreams. By exploring popular psychological trends of the era and discussing their influence on dream studies and morality, a framework shall be developed to discuss the mental struggles in the novels[…]

“‘I wasn’t being rude, just facetiously condescending’: An Analysis of Rudeness in Pride and Prejudice and Hay Fever” Academic Essay by Samantha Bowen

In The Virtues of Our Vices, Emrys Westacott considers an act in today’s society ‘rude’ so long as it satisfies two conditions: if it “violates a social convention; and if the violation were deliberate, indicating a lack of concern for another person’s feelings” (18). Within Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, rudeness is not as overtly defined; nevertheless, it serves as an overarching social mechanism […]

“Reimagining the Canadian Multiculture” Academic Essay by Helen Wagner

When Canada’s Multiculturalism Policy first emerged in 1971 it was primarily reactionary in nature, seeking to define Canada’s multicultural identity in opposition to two cultural models familiar to the Canadian public: the first, the American “melting-pot” mentality and the second, Canada’s previous cultural structure, biculturalism. However, the Canadian multiculture long predates the policy, stretching back, theoretically, to the nation’s establishment […]

“Interrogating the Ideological Centre of School Spaces: Spatial Reinforcement and Resistance of Cis-normativity in Alex Gino’s George” Academic Essay by Julia Tikhonova

Functioning as microcosms of society’s social inequalities, schools often mirror social norms and ideologies, providing a significant context in which children begin to form and understand gender identities. The complex cultural arena of this “hidden curriculum” is portrayed in Alex Mino’s George, wherein the protagonist struggles to find a means to express her identity as a transgender girl […]

““Totally Hosed”: Adult Life and the Kafkan Parable in Wallace’s “Adult World”” Academic Essay by Taylor Tomko

“Totally Hosed”: Adult Life and the Kafkan Parable in Wallace’s “Adult World” Academic Essay by Taylor Tomko In 2005, David Foster Wallace delivered a commencement address to the graduates of Kenyon College. This speech, which would come to be known as This is Water, argues that education teaches us not so much how to think, but